Scientific Program 2019-01-14T19:31:32+00:00

Scientific Program

CRC 2019 Program at a Glance and detailed web-based Preliminary Program are now available!

Building on the success of past conferences, the scientific program is inter-disciplinary and designed to appeal to clinicians, scientists and educators in the respiratory field. It promotes discussion of the most significant developments in clinical practice, research and education and enhances inter-professional interactions.

At the end of the conference, attendees will be better able to:

  • Apply updated, evidence-based scientific information to promote lung health in patients with respiratory disease;
  • Collaborate with other respiratory stakeholders, through communication, information-sharing, networking and partnership-building;
  • Translate and integrate recent clinical research on the prevention, management and treatment of respiratory diseases.

The scientific program will present cutting-edge concepts and current research from a variety of perspectives. A wide range of topics will be addressed as they relate to adult and pediatric respiratory health, asthma, COPD, pulmonary rehabilitation, critical care, pleural disease, ILD, sleep medicine and much more!

  • Thursday, April 11th
  • Friday, April 12th
  • Saturday, April 13th
1230 – 1330

CTS Annual General Meeting

CTS members are invited to take part in CTS’ Annual General Meeting over lunch. The CTS President and Treasurer will present their annual reports and members will vote for a new Executive Committee secretary and ratify appointments to the CTS Board of Directors. There will be ample time for questions and answers and the meeting will conclude in time for members to join the CRC Opening Plenary. Prospective members are also invited to attend to learn more about the CTS.

For more information, please contact: Janet Sutherland, CTS Executive Director, 613-235-6650, ext. 120 |  jsutherland@cts-sct.ca

1400 - 1500

Plenary Session

Opening Remarks

Opening remarks by CRC 2019 Conference Co-Chairs Dr. Shawn Aaron and Dr. Judy King.

Advances in Lung Transplantation: State of the Art

Dr. Shaf Keshavjee, The University Health Network, Toronto, ON

Ever since the first successful lung transplant was performed in Toronto in 1983, the field has continued to evolve. More and more patients with end stage lung disease now have lung transplantation as a life- saving option. Survival and quality of life outcomes of lung transplantation continue to improve. Advances in surgical techniques and postoperative patient care have made it possible to transplant sicker patients and extracorporeal lung support technologies have made successful bridge to lung transplantation a routine reality. Advances in donor lung evaluation, preservation and treatment with ex vivo lung perfusion have doubled the number of lung transplants performed. We are on a threshold of a revolutionary change in the field of transplantation – the era of “personalized medicine for the organ” and the ability to engineer “super-organs” to provide superior post-transplant outcomes.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • understand the current indications for lung transplantation;
  • appreciate current capabilities in lung preservation and bridge to lung transplantation with artificial lung technologies.; and
  • describe state of the art outcomes of lung transplantation as well as future directions.
Dr. Shaf Keshavjee

Dr. Shaf Keshavjee is a Thoracic surgeon and Director of the Toronto Lung Transplant Program. He is Surgeon-in-Chief, James Wallace McCutcheon Chair in Surgery at University Health Network. He is a Professor Division of Thoracic Surgery and Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, and Vice Chair for Innovation, Department of Surgery at the University of Toronto.

Dr Keshavjee completed his medical training at the University of Toronto in 1985. He subsequently trained in General Surgery, Cardiac Surgery and Thoracic Surgery at the University of Toronto followed by fellowship training at Harvard University and the University of London for airway surgery and heart-lung transplantation respectively. He joined the faculty at the University of Toronto in 1994 and was promoted to full professor in 2002. Dr. Keshavjee served as the Chair of the Division of Thoracic Surgery at the University of Toronto from 2004 to 2010. He was also the inaugural holder of the Pearson-Ginsberg Chair in Thoracic Surgery.

Dr Keshavjee’s clinical practice is in thoracic oncology, lung cancer and lung transplantation. He has a passion for surgery and innovative research. He is a scientist in the McEwen Center for Regenerative Medicine at UHN. He leads a team of researchers in a foremost research program and is widely published in the field. His specific research interest is in lung injury related to transplantation. His current work involves the study of molecular diagnostics and gene therapy strategies to repair organs and to engineer superior organs for transplantation.

Dr. Keshavjee has served on the board of directors of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation, The Canadian Society of Transplantation and on the Governing Council of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery. He has received numerous awards for contributions to medicine, including the George Armstrong Peters Young Investigator Award, Canada’s Top 40 Under 40 Award, the Colin Woolf Award for Excellence in Medical Education and the Lister Prize in Surgery – the highest award for research achievement in the University of Toronto Department of Surgery. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences and has been awarded an Honorary Doctor of Science Degree from Ryerson University, as well as an Honorary Doctorate of Science from Queen’s University. He received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Canadian Society for Transplantation for his contributions to the field of lung transplantation. He has also received two Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medals. He was awarded the Order of Ontario and also received Canada’s highest civilian honour with an appointment as an Officer of the Order of Canada.

1500 – 1530
1530 – 1730

Plenary Sessions

AllerGen NCE and CRRN: Research Results 2015-2019

Canadian Cohort Obstructive Lung Disease (CanCOLD): Scientific Discoveries in COPD!

Dr. Jean Bourbeau, McGill University, Montréal, QC
Dr. Wan Tan, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC

CanCOLD is the only population-based COPD longitudinal study in the world taking its origin from the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD). No other country than Canada has expanded the cross-sectional/prevalence study and insured a longitudinal design with prospective follow-up and detailed measurements by questionnaires, lung function and exercise, imaging with CTScan and biobank. BOLD/COLD in Canada expanded from Vancouver to four additional cities including Montréal, then in 2009 expanding to nine cities and implementing the longitudinal phase, i.e., CanCOLD. In 2018, the three years prospective follow-up of the CanCOLD subjects has been completed. Results from CanCOLD studies have been published in the most renowned medical journals in the respiratory field (Lancet Respiratory Medicine, AJRCCM, ERJ, Chest, Thorax, etc.). More than 50 collaborative substudies have been accepted in partnership with academia including the CRRN and others with industry. In this presentation, an overview of the impact of CanCOLD to date including the emerging knowledge, insights and discoveries will be presented.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • describe the CanCOLD study and it importance as a COPD cohort;
  • give a summary of the accomplishments and challenges; and
  • give an overview of the impact of CanCOLD to date, i.e. the emerging knowledge, insights and discoveries.
Dr. Jean Bourbeau

Dr. Jean Bourbeau is a pulmonologist and full professor in the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology and Biostatistics of the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University. He is the Director of the Research Institute MUHC’s Center for Innovative Medicine. He is Director of the COPD Clinic and the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Unit at the MUHC Montréal Chest Institute. He leads the COPD group of the FRQS Respiratory Network. He is a member of the board of directors of Réseau québécois d’éducation en santé respiratoire (RQESR). He has been President of the Canadian Thoracic Society. He also sits on the scientific committee of GOLD.

Over 250 of his publications have been published in peer-reviewed journals and book chapters. His work and research, especially on COPD, pulmonary rehabilitation, integrated self-management programs for patients with COPD (‘Living Well with COPD’: www.livingwellwithcopd.com) have had an impact not only in the field of research, but also in clinical practice and in the public domain at national and international levels. His other research includes a national epidemiological study of COPD (“CanCOLD” Canadian Cohort Obstructive Lung Disease).

Dr. Wan C Tan

Dr. Wan C Tan is an Honorary Professor in the Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, BC, Canada and the Division of Respiratory Medicine, St Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Prior to that she was Professor of Medicine at the National University of Singapore and Consultant Physician and Pulmonologist at the National University Hospital in Singapore. Dr. Tan has long standing involvement with global management guidelines for asthma and COPD. An author of over 200 publications in peer-reviewed journals, Dr. Tan serves as Editorial Board Member and Reviewer for various journals, including Respiratory Medicine, Journal of COPD, Journal of the IUATLD, Respirology, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, and CHEST she has current major research interests in: hospitalization and re-hospitalizations in COPD; characterization of mild/ early COPD; eosinophilic phenotypes in COPD. She is the Co-Principle Investigator for the longitudinal CanCOLD [Canadian Cohort of Obstructive Lung Disease] Study, the definitive study for measuring and phenotyping COPD in the community.

The CHILD Study: Past, Present and Future

Dr. Malcolm Sears, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON
Dr. Padmaja Subbarao, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON

The Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) study, a national birth cohort study of almost 3500 infants, their mothers and most fathers, is one of the largest intensively investigated and phenotyped population-based cohorts focused on understanding the diversity of environmental and host factors predisposing to asthma and allergy. Funded by CIHR and the Allergy, Genes and Environment (AllerGen) NCE, and sustained by AllerGen, this landmark Canadian study involving some 50 investigators and their teams has produced key insights into environmental, genetic, nutritional and microbiome factors associated with these conditions. All 5-year-old assessments have been completed, with over 90% retention, and assessments of the cohort at 8-9 years are underway. We will identify new knowledge gained from this study relating to Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) and highlight the ongoing importance of this study to Canadian research in non-communicable diseases, particularly respiratory and allergy-related, and the public.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • review the gaps in knowledge about the development of asthma and allergy and why the CHILD Study was initiated;
  • provide novel insights into the development of asthma and allergy from infancy gained from the CHILD study; and
  • indicate the potential for continuation of CHILD including multidisciplinary studies of the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease.

 

Dr. Malcolm Sears

Professor Malcolm Sears graduated in medicine from the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, and undertook clinical and research training in Dunedin and the University of Washington, Seattle. He was on faculty at Otago until 1990, when he was recruited to McMaster University to direct what is now the Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health. He stepped down as Research Director of the Firestone Institute in 2009, but continues to be very active in epidemiological research. Dr Sears developed and led the asthma and allergy components of the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Development Study of 1000 New Zealand infants born in 1972-73, and was the Founding Director of the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study of 3500 children launched in 2008. He has obtained multiple research grants from federal agencies including CIHR and the Allergy, Genes and Environment (AllerGen) Network of Centres of Excellence for the CHILD Study. Dr. Sears has published over 350 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters. He is a fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, the Royal College of Physicians (Canada), the American Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology, and the European Respiratory Society.

Dr. Padmaja Subbarao

Dr. Padmaja Subbarao is a Senior Scientist and Pediatric Respirologist at the Hospital for Sick Children. She is the Director and former Toronto Site leader of the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study. She is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Paediatrics and Physiology at the University of Toronto.

She has held a New Investigator Award from CIHR for clinical research and her lab has been continuously funded by CIHR and AllerGen NCE since 2005. In January 2018, Dr. Subbarao as a co-Principal investigator with Drs. Turvey (lead), Finlay and Kobor were awarded a multi-million dollar grant Genome Canada to investigate the role of the microbiome in asthma.

Her interests are in studying longitudinal objective lung function measurements from infancy to improve diagnostics and phenotyping of asthma. In studying longitudinal trajectories of lung function along with symptoms and relating them to environmental exposures, she hopes to understand the developmental origins of chronic obstructive lung disease and factors related to persistence and remission.

Climate Change and Air Pollution: The ‘New Normal’ and its Threat to Lung Health

Dr. Chris Carlsten, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC

Climate change is increasingly well documented, and in Canada that is reflected by increasing temperatures, forest fires, allergens, and pollution hot spots. After years of improvement in air quality, this ‘new normal’ risks setbacks to progress in lung health. Particularly concerning is that associated exposures can be unpredictable but intermittently very high, and combined in a fashion that creates harmful synergies.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • appreciate the trends in exposures related to climate change that threaten lung health;
  • be aware of current efforts to understand this pattern and, in turn, remediate it; and
  • know what evidence-based advice to provide patients and health authorities regarding mitigating measures therein

For more information, please see:
https://pollutionlab.com
https://twitter.com/PollutionLab

Dr. Chris Carlsten

Chris Carlsten, MD MPH is Professor of Medicine, and Head of Respiratory Medicine at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Carlsten holds the Astra-Zeneca Chair and is the Canada Research Chair in Occupational and Environmental Lung Disease. He is the Director of the Air Pollution Exposure Laboratory and the Centre for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Disease and also holds positions at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, the UBC School of Population and Public Health and the Centre for Heart Lung Innovation (formerly James Hogg Research Centre).

He attended undergraduate and medical school at Stanford University before training in internal, occupational, pulmonary and critical care medicine at the University of Washington.

The Carlsten laboratory leverages the power of controlled human exposure methodology to focus on the respiratory and immunological health effects of inhaled environmental and occupational threats, using diesel exhaust, western red cedar, and phthalates as model inhalants.

As director of the Occupational Lung Disease Clinic at The Lung Centre (Vancouver General Hospital), Dr. Carlsten welcomes patients with concerns regarding occupational or environmental exposures contributing to respiratory disease including rhinitis, asthma, COPD, interstitial lung disease, cancer, and pleural disease.

For more information, please see:

https://pollutionlab.com

https://twitter.com/PollutionLab

Hon. Catherine McKenna

TBA

1730 – 1930
0700 – 0815

Optional Breakfast Session: CTS Mastermind Challenge

CTS Mastermind Challenge: A Team-based Competition Among Respirology Fellows

Masters of Ceremonies:
Dr. Gerard Cox
Dr. David McCormack

0830 - 1000

Plenary Session & Award Presentations

CIHR-ICRH/CTS Distinguished Lecture in Respiratory Sciences: Treatment of Latent TB Infection – safety first. Time to move on from INH

The ICRH and CTS established the Distinguished Lecture in Respiratory Sciences Award in 2006 to honour scholars in the respiratory field. Nominations are solicited from the respiratory research community and assessed against the following criteria:

  • impact of the nominee’s research on respiratory sciences in Canada and the extent to which the nominee has contributed significantly to the advancement of respiratory sciences in Canada over the last ten years;
  • relevance/application/impact of nominee’s research to a clinical setting; and
  • demonstrated strength and reputation of the nominee in the field of respiratory sciences in Canada.

It is with great pleasure that CIHR-ICRH and CTS announce that the 2019 Distinguished Lecture in Respiratory Sciences has been awarded to Dr. Dick Menzies from McGill University. Dr. Menzies has been involved in TB research for almost 30 years and in shaping diagnosis, treatment, and prevention policy and practice at the provincial, national, and international level. He is the Editor of the 7th edition Canadian Tuberculosis Standards and will present on the topic of ‘Treatment of Latent TB Infection – safety first. Time to move on from INH’.

Session Description
This lecture will review the pathogenesis of TB and the rationale for treatment of latent TB. Diagnosis and management, including the concept of cascade of care in latent TB will be discussed. The treatment of latent TB, including the current standard of INH for six – nine months, three to four months INH & Rifampin and three months INH & Rifapentine will be reviewed. Finally, two recent trials of four months Rifampin will be discussed. The lecture will conclude with a comparison of the different treatment options and the rationale for moving on from INH to some Rifamycin-based treatments.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • understand the rationale for treatment of latent TB;
  • comprehend the different treatment options for latent TB and their advantages and disadvantages; and
  • recognize why we need to stop using INH as our standard treatment and move on to a rifampin or rifapentine–based regimen.
Dr. Dick Menzies

Dr. Dick Menzies received his medical training at McGill University, Montreal and specialty training in Internal Medicine at the Medical College of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, USA.  He then worked for 2 ½ years in Lesotho, Africa, where he was first exposed (literally) to tuberculosis – in all its forms, and with all its devastation. He then received sub-specialty training in Respiratory Medicine and a Masters degree in Epidemiology & Biostatistics at McGill University.  Dr. Menzies served as Medical Director at the Montreal Chest Institute for a total of 10 years ending in 2002, and then as Director of the Respiratory Division for 9 years. He is now Director of the Respiratory Epidemiology Unit at McGill University and McGill’s WHO Collaborating Centre in TB Research.

Dr. Menzies has a long history of involvement in tuberculosis care and research, beginning with his years in Lesotho, where tuberculosis is highly endemic.  Since his return to Montreal he has developed a tuberculosis research programme of clinical and epidemiologic studies linked with a large multi-disciplinary clinical service at the Montreal Chest Institute, and the Public Health Unit of Montreal. He developed and lead international collaborative groups in nosocomial transmission of TB, MDR-TB treatment, INH Resistant TB treatment, and large scale randomized trials in 9 countries. Dr. Menzies has also been involved as a consultant to National TB Programs in the Dominican Republic, Guyana and Ecuador, and was on sabbatical at WHO in 2014-15 where he helped develop the Global Action Framework for TB Research. He has worked with WHO and other agencies to develop guidelines for treatment of active and latent Tuberculosis. He has published over 300 peer-reviewed papers and more than 30 book chapters based on the results of his research.

1000 – 1030
1030 – 1200

Concurrent Sessions

CTS Year in Review

Leading respiratory experts will present the latest evidence-based clinical practice updates from CTS.

Canadian Cardiovascular Society/CTS Joint Position Statement on Pulmonary Hypertension (PH)

Dr. Sanjay Mehta, University of Western Ontario, ON

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • identify risk factors for PH and recognize patients with PH in their practice;
  • appropriately investigate a patient with suspected PH; and
  • discuss Canadian recommendations for use of PH-targeted medical therapies and management strategies for PH patients.
Dr. Sanjay Mehta

Dr. Sanjay Mehta is a Consultant Respirologist and Professor of Medicine at the University of Western Ontario, and Director of the Southwest Ontario Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) Clinic at the London Health Sciences Center in London, Canada. He is currently the Chair of the Pulmonary Hypertension Association of Canada, and a former Chair of the Pulmonary Vascular Disease Committee of the CTS.  Dr. Mehta graduated from McGill University in 1988 before completing fellowships in Respiratory Medicine at McGill University in Montreal (1991-1994) and Harvard University in Boston (1994-1996). Dr. Mehta’s clinical and research interests include PH, pulmonary embolism, cardiopulmonary and exercise physiology, sepsis, ARDS, and endothelial cell biology. 

Respiratory Health Effects of Cannabis

Dr. Matthew Stanbrook, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON

Learning Objectives:
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • be aware of respiratory symptoms and lung function changes associated with cannabis use
  • understand what is known about associations of cannabis use with the development of lung diseases
  • know the evidence regarding the possible benefits and harms of cannabis use by patients with existing chronic lung diseases.
Dr. Matthew Stanbrook

Dr. Stanbrook completed medical school, as well as residency training in Internal Medicine and Respirology, at the University of Toronto. He then moved to Boston, where he was the first person to hold the position of Editorial Fellow at The New England Journal of Medicine.  He subsequently returned to Toronto to complete his PhD in Clinical Epidemiology and was appointed to the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine in 2005.

Dr. Stanbrook is currently appointed as an Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine with cross-appointment to the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. He is a staff Respirologist at the Asthma & Airway Centre of the University Health Network and an Affiliate Scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences in Ontario.  In addition, he has served as Deputy Editor of the Canadian Medical Association Journal since 2007 and as an Associate Editor for ACP Journal Club since 2006. His major academic interests include COPD and asthma, e-cigarettes, and medical journalism.

2019 Update on Pharmacotherapy in Patients with COPD

Dr. Jean Bourbeau, McGill University, Montréal, QC

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • understand recent updates to the CTS Pharmacotherapy in patients with COPD evidence-based recommendations;
  • integrate recommendations for maintenance pharmacotherapy to improve symptoms and quality of life and reduce frequency and severity of AECOPD; and
  • discuss Canadian approach and Pharmacotherapy recommendations for COPD patients in view of the recent GOLD update 2019.
Dr. Jean Bourbeau

Dr. Jean Bourbeau is a pulmonologist and full professor in the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology and Biostatistics of the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University. He is the Director of the Research Institute MUHC’s Center for Innovative Medicine. He is Director of the COPD Clinic and the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Unit at the MUHC Montréal Chest Institute. He leads the COPD group of the FRQS Respiratory Network. He is a member of the board of directors of Réseau québécois d’éducation en santé respiratoire (RQESR). He has been President of the Canadian Thoracic Society. He also sits on the scientific committee of GOLD.

Over 250 of his publications have been published in peer-reviewed journals and book chapters. His work and research, especially on COPD, pulmonary rehabilitation, integrated self-management programs for patients with COPD (‘Living Well with COPD’: www.livingwellwithcopd.com) have had an impact not only in the field of research, but also in clinical practice and in the public domain at national and international levels. His other research includes a national epidemiological study of COPD (“CanCOLD” Canadian Cohort Obstructive Lung Disease).

Pleural Disease

Management of Benign Pleural Effusions with Chronic Indwelling Catheters

Dr. Kayvan Amjadi, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON

Many patients with benign pleural effusion suffer from disabling dyspnea and cough that severely impacts their quality of life. Vast majority of these patients suffer from impaired cardiac, renal, or hepatic function that is refractory to medical management, and they often have limited life expectancy. Management of their refractory pleural effusion often results in marked improvement in their dyspnea and quality of life. Although, chronic indwelling catheters are primarily promoted for outpatient management of patients with refractory malignant pleural effusion, more recently, these catheters have demonstrated similar beneficial outcomes in patients with benign disease. This presentation will review the literature supporting the use of chronic indwelling catheters in patients with benign, refractory, and symptomatic pleural effusion.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • review the literature for management of patients with pleural effusions secondary to advanced cardiac disease;
  • review the literature for management of patients with pleural effusions related to renal insufficiency; and
  • review the literature for management of patients with pleural effusions related to hepatic insufficiency.
Dr. Kayvan Amjadi

Dr. Kayvan Amjadi is the Director of Interventional Pulmonology program at The Ottawa Hospital. His main area of research include endoscopic management of pleural disease, central airway obstruction and lung cancer staging.

Management of Mesothelioma: Current Standard of Care and New Options

Dr. Marie-Eve Boucher, McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, QC

Despite the fact that new diagnosis has been steadily increasing over the past years, malignant pleural mesothelioma remains a rare disease with a high fatality rate. Pleural mesothelioma is highly morbid and new treatment options are required to alleviate patient’s symptom and improve their life expectancy. Over the past 30 years, very few advances have been made in terms of local control. However, there are some development in systemic therapeutic options. This presentation will review current standard of care for pleural mesothelioma and recent data on possible new options of treatment.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • summarize the different systemic treatments of pleural mesothelioma;
  • acquire information on potential novel therapies and ongoing trials; and
  • improve their ability to manage palliative care.
Dr. Marie-Eve Boucher

Dr. Boucher has graduated medicine school from Laval University, Quebec. In 2017, she completed a one year fellowship in thoracic oncology at the Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. She is currently working as a respirologist at Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis.

Pleural Infection: The American Approach

Dr. Alex Chee, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA

The aim of this presentation is to review current management of pleural infection, including the use of pleural drainage devices, fibrinolytic therapy and procedural approaches. The presentation will use a combination of previous studies, current guidelines/consensus statements as well as recently published literature for difficult to treat pleural infections.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • review current guidelines on the management of pleural infection;
  • understand controversial topics in pleural infection; and
  • be familiar with ongoing clinical trials in pleural infection management.
Dr. Alex Chee


Dr. Chee straddles the US and Canadian health systems, as Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School and Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of Calgary. At Site Director of the Combined Harvard Interventional Pulmonology fellowship program, he keeps his finger on the pulse of new technological developments in airway and pleural procedures.

Frailty in Respiratory Disease

Concept, Relevance and Clinical Impact

Dr. John Muscedere, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON

This presentation will review the concept of frailty and its conceptual frameworks, detail how to measure frailty and explore the impact of frailty on clinical outcomes. In addition, how the adverse impacts of frailty on clinical outcomes can be potentially mitigated will be covered. Finally, the presentation will conclude on how the research community can improve evidence for decision-making when dealing with frailty.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • understand the concept of frailty and vulnerability;
  • review differing conceptual frameworks for frailty and how to measure it; and
  • review the impact of frailty on clinical outcomes.
Dr. John Muscedere

John Muscedere is a Professor of Medicine at Queen’s University and an Intensivist at Kingston General Hospital in Kingston, Ontario Canada. He is the ICU Research Director for the Department of Critical Care Medicine at Queen’s University is the Scientific Director for the Networks of Centers of Excellence (NCE) funded Canadian Frailty Network whose mission is to improve care for older adults living with frailty.

Frailty in Respiratory Disease

Dr. Lianne Singer, University Health Network, Toronto, ON

Respiratory disease and frailty often go hand-in-hand, and can be a dangerous combination. But how does one tell if a patient with respiratory disease is frail, and why should one care? Ways of measuring frailty in patients with respiratory disease, the prevalence and clinical implications of frailty, and how one might think about reducing frail patients’ risk of adverse health outcomes will be discussed.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • recognize frailty in patients with respiratory disease;
  • describe how frailty may affect health outcomes in respiratory disease; and
  • identify potential approaches to ameliorating frailty or improving health in frail patients
Dr. Lianne Singer

Dr. Singer is Medical Director of the Toronto Lung Transplant Program at University Health Network, Toronto. She is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto with cross-appointments to the Institute of Medical Science and Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation. Her research focuses on health outcomes and clinical innovation in advanced lung disease and organ transplantation.

Pulmonary Rehab in Physical Frailty in People with Respiratory Disease

Dr. Didier Saey, Laval University, Québec, QC

Frailty is an important clinical syndrome affecting an estimated one in every ten people aged over 65 years and is consistently associated with adverse outcomes such as adverse drug reactions, mobility decline, increased risk of fall, disability onset, prolonged hospitalization and mortality. In individuals with COPD living in the community, the prevalence of frailty has been reported to be 58% and over 60% of patients attending a pulmonary rehabilitation program were reported to exhibit some level of frailty. The aims of this presentation are to describe impact of frailty on the potential of functional rehabilitation and to discuss whether and why functional pulmonary rehabilitation may impact frailty in different chronic respiratory diseases.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • describe impact of frailty on the potential of functional rehabilitation; and
  • discuss whether and why functional pulmonary rehabilitation may impact frailty in different chronic respiratory diseases.
Dr. Didier Saey

Dr. Saey is a full-time professor at the Department of Rehabilitation of Université Laval and a regular researcher at the research center of l’Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec. His research interests focus on muscle function and its role in the decreased of functional capacity and exercise capacity of patients with cardiorespiratory disease. He is also interested in implementation of new interventions and approaches in cardiorespiratory rehabilitation aimed to improving functional status, social participation and quality of life of patients with chronic cardiorespiratory disease.

Baby Done a Bad, Bad Thing: Update on Extubation and Management of Congenital Malformations in the NICU

Deciphering the Extubation Enigma in Extremely Preterm Infants

Dr. Wissam Shalish, McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, QC

Mechanical ventilation is a vital component of the initial respiratory management of extremely preterm infants, but its prolonged use is associated with significant harms. In an attempt to limit the duration of mechanical ventilation, clinicians strive to extubate these infants as early as deemed possible. Unfortunately, the extubation process has proven very challenging, with practices often being highly variable and reintubation rates ranking amongst the highest across all age groups. In this presentation, the complexities surrounding extubation in extremely preterm infants will be reviewed and will also attempt to decipher some of the current gaps in knowledge on this subject. An emphasis will be placed on understanding the prevalence, causes and consequences of extubation failure and provide an evidence-based approach towards assessment of extubation readiness in this high-risk population.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • understand the prevalence, causes and consequences of extubation failure in extremely preterm infants; and
  • review the evidence surrounding assessment of extubation readiness in extremely preterm infants.
Dr. Wissam Shalish

Dr. Shalish is a faculty member of the division of Neonatology at the Montreal Children’s Hospital. He is also completing a PhD in Experimental Medicine at McGill University, looking at the use of automated analyses of cardiorespiratory signals for the prediction of extubation readiness in extremely preterm infants. His research interests include weaning from mechanical ventilation, prediction of extubation readiness and biomedical signal analysis.

An Update on the Management of Tracheoesophageal Fistula

Dr. Tom Kovesi, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON

There is a large body of literature that infants with congenital tracheoesophageal fistula have long-term health consequences, which persist throughout adulthood. Some, but not all of this morbidity has been lessened by newer surgical techniques. These complications include tracheomalacia and the effects of aspiration, due to esophageal dysmotility, gastroesophageal reflux, and/or a recurrent tracheoesophageal fistula. There is ongoing controversy whether some of the long-term complications, including asthma, atopy, obstructive and restrictive pulmonary defects, and chronic bronchitis, are related to the underlying congenital anomaly, or other processes. Recent studies have highlighted previously-unsuspected complications, including vocal cord paralysis, laryngeal cleft, congenital esophageal stenosis, and eosinophilic esophagitis. This session will highlight recent guidelines, and the importance of multidisciplinary care and follow-up for these patients.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • recognize newly-appreciated associations between congenital tracheoesophageal fistula and other conditions;
  • Describe the long-term monitoring and follow-up of patients with tracheoesophageal fistula; and
  • identify the need for multi-disciplinary teams to follow-up patients with a history of tracheoesophageal fistula.
Dr. Tom Kovesi

Dr. Tom Kovesi is a pediatric respirologist at CHEO and is a professor of Pediatrics at the University of Ottawa. He’s past-chair of the Ontario Thoracic Society and the Pediatric Assembly of the CTS. He serves on the executive of the International network on esophageal atresia (INoEA), and on the esophageal atresia respiratory guidelines committee. Dr. Kovesi has published several highly-cited reviews of the long-term complications of Tracheoesophageal Fistula.

Update on Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

TBA

Dr. Pramod Puligandla

TBA

ILD: Approach to Diagnosis and How that Informs Management

Management of Patients with Unclassifiable ILD

Dr. Julie Morisset, University of Montréal, QC

This presentation will review the diagnostic approach and definition of unclassifiable ILD. Scientific evidence and some clinical strategies for the management of patients with unclassifiable ILD will be discussed.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • summarize the management of unclassifiable ILD;
  • prescribe an elaborate plan for the care of patients with unclassifiable ILD unclassifiable ILD; and
  • recognize the clinical challenges in the management of unclassifiable ILD
Dr. Julie Morisset

Julie Morisset works as a pulmonologist at the Interstitial Lung Disease clinic of the Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal.  She a clinical researcher interested in the multidisciplinary diagnosis and comprehensive management of ILD.

Cryobiopsies: Ready for Primetime?

Dr. Marc Fortin, Université de Laval, Québec, QC

Cryobiopsies are slowly being adopted in the diagnostic workup of interstitial lung disease. We will review history, technique, risks associated and diagnostic yield.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • understand the current level of evidence for clinical use of cryobiopsies in ILD;
  • understand risks associated with cryobiopsies; and
  • be familiar with the current level of evidence for clinical use of cryobiopsies in ILD.
Dr. Marc Fortin

IP fellowship Calgary 2014-2015, IP fellowship Marseille 2016, Staff at Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Quebec since 2016.

Long-term Monitoring of Fibrotic ILD

Dr. Jolene Fisher, University Health Network, Toronto, ON

Longitudinal monitoring of patients with fibrotic interstitial lung disease (ILD) is essential to identifying disease progression and guiding management decisions. Routine assessment of pulmonary symptoms and physiology are important for physician decision-making surrounding initiation or altering of ILD medications and the timing of lung transplant and/or palliative care referrals. Patients with fibrotic ILD are at increased risk for certain respiratory and non-respiratory comorbidities and these are important considerations in long-term monitoring. This presentation will summarize the key components of long-term monitoring of fibrotic ILD, including the appropriate frequency of monitoring, specific symptoms to consider and the objective testing that should be routinely performed. Identifying disease progression and how it influences management decisions will be addressed.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • determine the appropriate timing and frequency of longitudinal monitoring of fibrotic ILD, including specific symptoms and testing to consider at each patient encounter;
  • define disease progression in fibrotic ILD; and
  • summarize how disease progression influences management decisions for patients with fibrotic ILD.
Dr. Jolene Fisher

Dr. Jolene Fisher completed Respirology residency and an Interstitial Lung Disease fellowship at the University of Toronto, where she also received a Master’s of Science in Clinical Epidemiology and Health Care Research. She is currently a Clinician Investigator in the Division of Respirology at the University Health Network and Research Director of the Interstitial Lung Disease Program at the University of Toronto.

1200 – 1330
1200 – 1330

CTS – CHEST Conjoint Session: Building a Better ICU Team: Turning Today’s Lessons into Tomorrow’s Practice

Dr. Alexander Niven, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

Diagnostic error and therapeutic harm remain a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in our healthcare system, despite two decades of international effort to close the quality gap through patient safety and quality improvement initiatives. This presentation will define the challenges that persist in critical care based on recent literature, and discuss current and emerging efforts to improve patient outcomes, individual and team performance through the systematic application of organizational structure, processes, clinical informatics, and human factors research.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • review the challenges to see, effective critical care;
  • describe common elements that impact individual, team performance; and
  • examine currently available and novel strategies to improve ICU team performance and health care outcomes.
Dr. Alexander Niven

Dr. Niven is the Education Chair for the Critical Care Independent Multispecialty Practice at Mayo Clinic, and also currently serves as the Education Committee Chair for the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST). A retired Colonel from the United States Army Medical Department, and is a former program director for an Internal Mdicine residency, Chief, Education and Research Division, and Designated Institutional Official. His research interests focus on procedural teaching, simulation based education, and best education strategies to improve individual, team, and system performance in the intensive care unit.

1200 – 1330

CRHP Research Poster Adjudication

1330 – 1500

Concurrent Sessions

INSPIRED Approaches to COPD Care: Lessons Learned from the CFHI Scale Collaborative

Results of the INSPIRED Scale Collaborative Improvements in Coordinated Care and Patient Experience

Mr. Neil Drimer, Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement, Ottawa, ON

The INSPIRED outreach program is a proven intervention for patients living with moderate to severe COPD. As part of a Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) collaborative it was spread to 19 Canadian teams in 2014-15. Results included increased quality of life, and reductions in ED visits and hospital readmissions. In October 2017, CFHI launched a scale collaborative and partnered with six of the 2014-15 teams to expand the reach of INSPIRED to more patients who could stand to benefit from the program. This presentation will provide an overview of the preliminary results from the collaborative including improvements in patient experience and coordination of care. Lessons learned about scaling a health care innovation will also be shared.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • describe the preliminary outcomes from the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement INSPIRED scale collaborative;
  • discuss barriers and enablers to scaling up a health care innovation; and
  • assess the potential for an INSPIRED-like approach to COPD care in their practice settings.
Mr. Neil Drimer

As a Director of Programs at CFHI, Neil oversees pan-Canadian quality improvement collaboratives, including the Connected Medicine and INSPIRED scale programs. Neil has over 15 years of health system expertise. He managed the Quality Improvement Program at Canadian Forces Health Services, delivered education and client support in Rehab and Mental Health at the Canadian Institute for Health Information, and has extensive clinical experience as an Occupational Therapist in inpatient, ambulatory and community settings.

Integrating the INSPIRED Approach to COPD Into Primary Health Care: Lessons From the Field

Ms. Lily Spanjevic, Joseph Brant Hospital, Burlington, ON
Ms. Melanie Potvin, Joseph Brant Hospital, Burlington, ON
Ms. Emily Kitts, Horizon Health Network, Fredericton, NB

INSPIRED is a successful hospital to home program that enables patients to manage their COPD at home or in the community. Patients are generally enrolled in this program after they have been hospitalized for an acute exacerbation of COPD. As part of CFHI’s INSPIRED scale collaborative, two teams are looking to identify and partner with patients before they begin the cycle of admission, discharge and re-admission. Joseph Brant Hospital in Burlington, Ontario and Horizon Health Network in New Brunswick have both introduced COPD education and outreach programs through primary care. These programs are designed to catch COPD patients early and provide them with education and support to enable them to remain at home or in the community with limited need for hospital utilization. This presentation will share details of these programs as well as lessons learned about implementing a comprehensive chronic disease management program in primary care.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • describe the process of managing COPD education and outreach in primary care;
  • discuss the barriers and enablers for the primary care approach to managing patients living with COPD; and
  • assess opportunities for further integration of COPD education and outreach with local primary care teams.
Ms. Lily Spanjevic

Lily Spanjevic is a Clinical Nurse Specialist in Geriatrics-Medicine at Joseph Brant Hospital for the past 10 years. She is also the Clinical Lead for the INSPIRED, ICC and Breathe Easy Programs at the hospital as well. She has a cross appointment with the Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Nursing at McMaster University.

Ms. Melanie Potvin

Melanie is the Director Emergency, Medicine & Integrated Care Services at Joseph Brant Hospital. Melanie is a Registered Nurse with a breath of experience leading inpatient & ambulatory care teams towards integrated care delivery models. She holds a Masters of Business Administration, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, an Executive Health Care Green Belt and has been recognized for her leadership in the National Nursing Week- “Salute to our Heroes” section of the Canadian Hospital News publication.

Ms. Emily Kitts

Emily Kitts is a Respiratory Therapist working in Primary Health Care, for the Horizon Health Network, and is the Upstream Project Lead. Emily is particularly interested in how multidisciplinary teams can collaborate with patients and their families to identify and fill gaps in COPD prevention, screening, education and care.

The Impact of INSPIRED on the Patient and Family Experience of Care and Quality

Mr. Scott Bailey, Joseph Brant Hospital, Burlington, ON
Mr. Jacques Dalpé Horizon Health Network, Fredericton, NB

INSPIRED is a hospital-to-home model of care for patients with moderate to severe COPD. It is designed to allow patients to manage their illness at home or in the community. A big part of the success of the program is the partnership between providers and patients. Patients are involved in determining their goals for care and empowered to manage their illness. To ensure that the program continues to meet the needs of patients as it evolves and moves into other sectors, such as primary care, teams are working with patient partners throughout implementation. This session will share the experience of two of these patient partners.

Learning objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • describe the benefits of engaging patients in the management of chronic illness;
  • recognize the importance of working with patient partners in designing program implementation; and
  • apply lessons learned from the partnership between patients and providers in the INSPIRED program to program design and implementation.
Mr. Scott Bailey

Scott Bailey has a beautiful and understanding wife and five beautiful daughters. His has an athletic family with everyone playing sports. His daughter Autumn plays volleyball for Team Canada. Scott played baseball for Team Canada at the 25th World Championships and still plays softball and golfs. He gave up hardball because the longer base paths were harder to run with his COPD. He is a patient with the Caroline Family Health Team.

Mr. Jacques Dalpe

Jacques Dalpe loves music, and does mountain biking, walking and hiking on trails all year round! He enjoys spending time with the grandkids, and is always helping his friends with any projects that they might have on the go, in addition to working full time. He also has COPD.

CTS – ERS Conjoint Session: Asthma Exacerbation and Infection: The Need for Better Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention

Dr. Tobias Welte, ERS President

Viral infection is the most important trigger of exacerbations, both in Asthma and COPD, respectively. Preventive measures such as general hygiene recommendations will be presented but also vaccination strategies, diagnostic approaches and possible treatment strategies will be discussed. Future trends to improve outcome will be reviewed.

Learning objectives:
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • appreciate hand hygiene and vaccination strategies as preventive measures;
  • understand diagnostic approaches; and
  • describe future trends in treatment strategies.
Dr. Tobias Welte

Professor Welte is the President of the European Respiratory Society. He leads a multicentre research group focusing on the epidemiology, diagnosis and management of respiratory infections and the pathophysiology and treatment of obstructive airway disease. He has published around 800 papers in peer-reviewed journals and contributed to chapters in over 150 books.

Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing Workshop: Primer and Pearls

Dr. François Maltais, Institut de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Québec, QC
Dr. Alberto Neder, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON
Dr. Nha Voduc, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON

Using a practical case-based approach, this highly interactive session will provide the opportunity for delegates to grow their understanding and expertise in Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing (CPET). Beginners will find value in the foundational principles and cases discussed, while all attendees will appreciate the more complex examples and pearls shared by renowned experts. Faculty will offer their expert assessment and insight, allowing attendees to sharpen their own interpretation and understanding.

Learning objectives
At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:

  • describe normal exercise physiology and patterns of exercise response;
  • describe the indications, limitation and utility of CPET in the clinical setting; and
  • undertake an evidence-informed and precise CPET interpretation in a variety of common clinical settings and disease states.
Dr. Francois Maltais

Doctor Maltais is pulmonologist at the Quebec Heart and Lung Institute where he was chief of the pulmonary division from 2012 to 2017. He is professor at the Faculté de médecine de l’Université Laval. His major interests include the physiopathology of exercise intolerance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pulmonary rehabilitation. His researches, which are supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Canada’s premier funding agency for health research, also focus towards the understanding of the mechanism of limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. In 2006, he won the Romain Pauwels Award and, in 2016, the COPD Gold Medal, both given by the European Respiratory Society, in recognition of his outstanding contribution to the field of COPD. He became in 2009, the director of the Research Chair on COPD at Université Laval. Dr Maltais has authored or co-authored 250 scientific publications and he regularly speaks at international conferences.

Since 1998, he is Director of the Pulmonary Rehabilitation at the Quebec Heart and Lung Institute and Director of Respiratory Research at the same institution.

Dr Alberto Neder

TBA

Dr. Nha Voduc

Nha Voduc completed his Respirology training at Queen’s University. He is currently an associate professor and program director of the Respirology training program at the University of Ottawa and medical director of the pulmonary function lab at the Ottawa Hospital. His academic interests include cardiopulmonary exercise testing and medical education.

Delivery of Pulmonary Rehabilitation in the Face of Complexity

The Complex Scenario of Early Rehabiliation After Acute Exacerbation of COPD: How Do We Tackle It?

Dr.Tania Janaudis-Ferreira, McGill University, Montréal, QC

In recent years, the number of studies examining the effects of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) during or immediately after an acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) has increased considerably and, as a result, international guidelines on PR have incorporated recommendations about participation within four weeks of hospital discharge. Patients who complete PR following an AECOPD have improved exercise tolerance, a better health-related quality of life, heightened mood and are at a reduced risk of being readmitted to hospital. However, recent studies demonstrate poor referral, uptake, and completion rates to early post-AECOPD PR. As such, despite the guidelines recommendations for PR post-AECOPD, there is a need to establish the optimal referral pathway to PR and the manner in which PR can be best delivered, by increasing its acceptability to patients whilst still producing important clinical effects.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • provide an overview of the evidence for the benefits of early pulmonary rehabilitation after acute exacerbation of AECOPD;
  • review the issues around delivering early pulmonary rehabilitation post-AECOPD; and
  • discuss potential solutions for a more acceptable intervention to patients post-AECOPD.
Dr. Tania Janaudis-Ferreira

Dr. Tania Janaudis-Ferreira is an Assistant Professor with the School of Physical and Occupational Therapy at McGill University and a Junior Scientist with the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. The overall goal of Dr. Janaudis-Ferreira’s research program is to improve care and rehabilitation outcomes of individuals with chronic lung disease and transplant candidates and recipients.

Management of Multi-Morbidity in Pulmonary Rehabilitation

Dr. Claude Poirier, University of Montreal, Montréal, QC

By 2020, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) will be the third cause of mortality. Extrapulmonary comorbidities influence the cares of patients with COPD : coronary heart disease, heart failure and lung cancer, systemic venous thromboembolism, anxiety, depression, osteoporosis, obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, sleep disturbance and anaemia. All of these diseases potentiate the morbidity of COPD, leading to increased hospitalisations and healthcare utilization. They are associated with poor pronosis. Comorbidities are a challenge in care of COPD and need to be evaluated and treated adequately.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • discuss the prevalence of comorbidities in COPD;
  • explain the impact of the comorbidities on COPD prognosis; and
  • propose an integrative approach in COPD care.
Dr. Claude Poirier

Dr. Claude Poirier is a respirologist at the Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal, in Montréal. He did his fellowship in pulmonary rehabilitation, and did open the CHUM Rehab centre in 2005. In November 2017, he did open the first large community-based rehabilitation centre in Montréal, the INSPIR’ER centre.

Pulmonary Rehabilitation Research and Care for Underserved Populations

Dr. Pat Camp, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC

Pulmonary rehabilitation is a key component in the chronic disease management of people with COPD and other chronic respiratory diseases. Although it is recognized that there are not enough pulmonary rehabilitation programs in Canada, some groups may be especially at risk of receiving inequitable care. This presentation will focus on the research and provision of pulmonary rehabilitation for underserved populations, including Indigenous peoples, refugee and new Canadian populations, and other potentially underserved groups.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • gain awareness of the inequitable distribution of pulmonary rehabilitation services in Canada;
  • appreciate important research findings and emerging research projects to address the problem; and
  • better define their role in providing optimal pulmonary rehabilitation to underserved populations.
Dr. Pat Camp

Dr. Camp is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia. Her research focuses on pulmonary rehabilitation, with a specific interest in rehabilitation for individuals with an acute exacerbation of COPD, and rehabilitation and lung health for Indigenous peoples in Canada.

Who Wants Sleep? They do, they do: Focus on Current Evidence and Sleep in Pediatric Subpopulations

Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea Diagnosis: Current State and Up & Coming

Dr. Joanna MacLean, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB

This presentation will review the current state of the diagnosis of pediatric obstructive sleep, in Canada and worldwide, including evaluating the tools available to assist with this diagnosis. Recognizing the limitations of the currently available tools, new approaches and the evidence behind these approaches will be explored.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • compare different approached to the diagnosis of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea;
  • evaluate the best approach to the diagnosis of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea in a given context; and
  • consider new tools to assist in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea.
Dr. Joanna MacLean

Joanna MacLean is an Associate Professor and Clinician-Scientist in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Alberta and the Medical Director of the Pediatric Sleep Laboratory at the Stollery Children’s Hospital. Her research interests focus on the development of sleep and breathing in early life and the impact of altered sleep breathing on subsequent health outcomes.

Impact of Pre-school Sleep Disruption on Learning and Behaviour: Results from the CHILD Study

Dr. Piush Mandhane, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB

The CHILD study is one of the largest hands on birth cohorts in Canada. The CHILD study Edmonton site has had a specific focus on the impact of early childhood sleep on learning and behaviour. In addition to the extensive CHILD assessment, CHILD Edmonton completed home polysomnography at one year of age and asked parents to complete validated sleep questionnaires quarterly from three months of age.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • be able to describe normal sleep patterns through the first five years of life;
  • understand the impact of sleep disruption on childhood learning and behaviour; and
  • recognize when a child should be referred for a more indepth sleep assessment.
Dr. Piush Mandhane

Dr. Mandhane is a pediatric respirologist with a PhD in clinical epidemiology and biostatistics. He is one of the CHILD study principal investigators and the CHILD study Edmonton site leader.

Dr. Mandhane’s research focus is examing childhood sleep and sleep disruption among the CHILD study participants.

Heavy Sleep: Sleep and Obesity

Dr. Sherri Katz, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON

This presentation will highlight the unique features of sleep disordered breathing in children with obesity. Pathophysiology and the relative merits of different diagnostic testing strategies will be reviewed. Co-morbidities of sleep disordered breathing in children with obesity and outcomes of treatment with non-invasive ventilation will be discussed, particularly focusing on data from a recent Canadian multicenter prospective cohort study in this population.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • discuss the relative merits of different diagnostic tests for sleep disordered breathing in children with obesity;
  • recognize associated co-morbidities of obesity and concurrent OSA in childhood; and
  • review outcomes of noninvasive ventilation in children with obesity and obstructive sleep apnea, focusing on results of recent Canadian studies.
Dr. Sherri Katz

Dr. Sherri Katz is a Pediatric Respirologist, Acting Chief of the Division of Pediatric Respirology and Director of the Sleep Laboratory at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, as well as Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Ottawa. She is a Senior Scientist at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute and is the principal investigator of several multicentre studies evaluating respiratory technologies including non-invasive ventilation in children with obesity and lung volume recruitment in children with neuromuscular diseases. She is also a wife and proud Mom of two daughters.

1500 – 1530
1530 - 1700

Moderated Poster Session

0730 – 0830
0830 – 1000

Concurrent Sessions

Advanced Palliative Care and End of Life

Withdrawing Life Support: Individualism or Shared Decision

Dr. Louise Chartrand, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB

The 1996 Health Care Consent Act of Ontario (Canada) is a law that regulates medical decision making. Therefore, it also gives indications on how end of life decisions should be made. The goal of the law was to ensure and protect patient’s autonomy and avoid medical paternalism, especially at the end of life. This presentation would like to argue that one of the consequences of the 1996 Health Care Consent Act of Ontario is to promote individualism. Therefore, this law makes it improbable to attain a shared decision model. More specifically, the way the 1996 Health Care Consent Act is currently written, a proxy is assigned as a decision-maker for someone who is deemed incompetent. However, it also ensures that the proxy will be the only one with the burden of that decision. This argument will be supported by providing a qualitative description of three cases encountered during Dr. Chartrand’s six-month fieldwork in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a hospital located in Ontario. The presentation will offer a reflection upon the consequences of using an alternative decision maker (proxy) to withdraw life support.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • establish the difference between individualism and autonomy;
  • establish the difference between individual and shared decision making; and
  • propose new ways to improve decision making in regards to withdrawing life support.
Dr. Louise Chartrand

TBA

The Role of Family in Critical Care: Balancing Burden and Benefit to Patient and Family

Ms. Tania Larsen, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON

Critical illness and its associated interventions create long-term physical, psychological and cognitive deficits that persist well beyond hospital discharge. It is becoming increasingly recognized that not only survivors of critical illness, but family members, can experience these persistent negative symptoms following discharge as well. This presentation will discuss the evolving role of family in critical care and highlight challenges associated with best supporting both patients and families during the process of recovery from critical illness.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • review the constellation of persistent negative symptoms associated with recovery from critical illness for both patients and families;
  • describe the emerging role of family in critical care medicine; and
  • highlight challenges associated with best supporting both patients and families during the process of recovery from critical illness.
Dr. Tania Larsen

Tania Larsen graduated from Western University with a BSc Physical Therapy in 2003, a MSC in 2006 and a PhD in 2018. She works as a physiotherapist at London Health Sciences Centre and also as a Lecturer within the school of Physical Therapy at Western University.

A Sigh of Relief: Palliative Management of Dyspnea and Cough in Advanced ILD

Dr. Charlene Fell, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB

As interstitial lung diseases advance, patients suffer from progressive, debilitating, and distressing dyspnea and cough. In this session, you will learn about the mechanisms driving dyspnea and cough, non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic techniques to address these symptoms in patients with advanced ILD, and the evidence supporting these practices. Medication side effects and potential pitfalls will also be addressed. A collaborative and multidisciplinary approach to managing dyspnea and cough in the patient with advanced ILD will be emphasized.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • identify the physiologic mechanisms behind dyspnea and cough in patients with advanced ILD;
  • propose non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic strategies to manage dyspnea and cough in patients with advanced ILD;
  • discuss the advantages of a multidisciplinary approach to managing dyspnea and cough in patients with advanced ILD.
Dr. Charlene Fell

TBA

CTS – ATS Conjoint Session: Solving the Puzzle of Asthma Disparities

Dr. Juan Celedón, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA

Asthma is the most common chronic respiratory disease and a major public health problem in high income nations. In the United States and Canada, economically disadvantaged individuals and members of certain racial or ethnic minority groups are disproportionately affected by asthma. Such health disparities in asthma are multifactorial, involving complex interactions between heredity and environment. In this presentation, novel research findings suggesting causal roles for genetic and epigenetic variation, psychosocial stress, vitamin D insufficiency, and obesity in asthma among underserved populations will be critically assessed. Feasible approaches to reducing existing health disparities in asthma will also be discussed.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • briefly review the genetics and epigenetics of asthma in minority populations;
  • assess the impact of environmental and behavioral risk factors on asthma; and
  • discuss new approaches to reduce health care disparities in asthma.
Dr. Juan C. Celedon

Dr. Celedón is the Niels K. Jerne Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine, and Division Chief of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. His research goals are to identify genetic and environmental determinants of airway diseases. He leads NIH- funded projects on the genetics and epidemiology of asthma, and a clinical trial of vitamin D supplementation to prevent asthma attacks in children.

Communication Skills for Patient Education in the 21st Century

Dr. Judy King, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON
Mrs. Cinde Little, Community Pediatric Asthma Service, Calgary, AB
Ms. Colleeen Makarowski,University Lung Clinic, Edmonton, AB

Why doesn’t everyone follow the advice of his or her health care professional? Communication skills and a variety of teaching tools are key but this is a complex question with no single answer. With changes in the workplace and easy access to health information for all users of the healthcare system, health educators need to be flexible and provide messages in new ways. During this interactive workshop we will look at the barriers to health education for both the health care professional and the learner. The session will combine presentations, group work and time for sharing ideas. Topics will include knowledge translation, health literacy, novel tools, changing work environments and strategies for everyone including 21st century learners.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • identify an aspect of their patient education interventions that they can improve to be better client/patient-oriented practitioners;
  • list potential solutions for their workplace to remove current barriers to clients/ patients to receive effective educational messages; and
  • initiate a brainstorming session in their workplace to identify current barriers for health care professionals to provide effective patient education and identify potential solutions.
Dr. Judy King

Dr. Judy King is a physiotherapist and associate professor in the physiotherapy program at the University of Ottawa in Canada. Her patient centred research is in the area of patient education, specifically as it relates to chronic disease management, for people living with chronic cardiac and respiratory conditions. As well as her research, teaching and service activities she maintains a clinical position at The Ottawa Hospital in the Intensive Care Unit.

Ms. Cinde Little

Cinde has been working as a respiratory educator for the past 24 years. She was instrumental in the implementation of the Smoking Cessation Counselling workshop for the University of Calgary medical school curriculum. She is currently an education consultant for the Community Pediatric Asthma Service in Calgary, Alberta. As well, Cinde is a trainer for the nationally recognized RespTrec program which prepares health professionals to become Certified Respiratory Educators.

Ms. Colleen Makarowski

Colleen Makarowski is a Certified Respiratory Educator currently working at University Lung Clinic supporting lung specialists in asthma and COPD specific clinics as well as a role with primary care supporting a family physician. Colleen trained as a Respiratory Therapist in Edmonton and has worked in a variety of provinces and roles over the past 30 years. The CRE role has provided Colleen the opportunity to expand the role of Respiratory Therapy by having more direct patient-centred care and interactions.

It’s Not Unusual: Less Common Disease Becoming More Well Known When One Knows Where and How to Look

Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

Dr. Adam Shapiro, Montréal Children’s Hospital, Montréal, QC

This presentation will provide summary information on the recent American Thoracic Society clinical practice guidelines for diagnosis of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), as well as review of the PCD Foundation consensus statement document on recommended therapies for patients with PCD.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • recognize the clinical phenotype encountered in classic PCD and when to investigate for this rare disease;
  • understand the limitations of clinical PCD testing and which tests are currently recommended in North America; and
  • become familiar with the currently recommended therapies for acute and chronic management of PCD.
Dr. Adam Shapiro

Dr. Shapiro is an assistant professor in Pediatric Respiratory Medicine at the Montreal Children’s Hospital, where he runs the only clinic for Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia in Quebec. He is also the chair of the American Thoracic Society clinical guidelines committee on diagnosis of PCD. Dr. Shapiro also served as the Medical Director of the PCD Foundation Clinical and Research Center Network.

Pediatric Interstitial Lung Disease Update

Dr. Sharon Dell, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON

Children’s interstitial lung disease (chILD) is rare but associated with the highest mortality of all pediatric chronic lung diseases. Multicenter clinical research networks have provided the infrastructure for driving advances in this field. Modern genome sequencing techniques have revealed novel mechanisms of disease in chILD. This session will briefly review the basic epidemiology, diagnosis and management of children’s interstitial lung disease (chILD) and then focus on recent literature advancing the field.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • know the classification of children’s ILD (chILD) by age group;
  • recognize clinical manifestations and prognosis of NEHI, PIG, ABCA3 and other chILD from recent literature; and
  • learn about new chILD (kids) on the block.
Dr. Sharon Dell

Dr. Sharon Dell, BEng, MD, FRCPC is a pediatric respirologist and senior associate scientist in the Research Institute at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. She is also a Full Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and past director (2010-2016) of the Clinical Epidemiology and Health Care Research MSc/PhD graduate program in the Institute of Health Policy Management & Evaluation at the University of Toronto. Dr. Dell divides her time between conducting research and clinical care, leading sub-specialty clinics in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), Children’s Interstitial Lung Disease (ChILD) (including pulmonary vasculitis) and severe asthma.

Genetic Testing in Pediatric ILD

Dr. Lawrence Nogee, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

Specific clinical and laboratory features of interstitial (diffuse) lung diseases in children will be reviewed, with an emphasis on recognizing disorders that are likely to have a genetic basis and their inheritance patterns. A particular focus will be on disorders related to the surfactant system, but more recently recognized disorders that also involve other organ systems will also be reviewed. Practical issues related to genetic testing will be discussed, including advantages and disadvantages of genetic testing, selection of appropriate tests based upon the clinical phenotype, interpretation of genetic testing results, the roles for whole exome or whole genome sequencing, and next steps when genetic testing results are negative or ambiguous.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • describe at least two typical clinical presentations of children presenting with diffuse lung disease that would lead one to consider genetic testing;
  • describe the differences between targeted gene testing, next-generation panels, and whole exome sequencing; and
  • name at least two advantages of genetic testing in the diagnosis of pediatric interstitial lung disease and one limitation of such testing.
Dr. Lawrence Nogee

Lawrence Nogee, M.D is a Professor of Pediatrics and an Attending Neonatologist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, MD, USA. His clinical interests focus on neonatal lung diseases, particularly the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia and pulmonary hypertension. His research interests have focused on genetic mechanisms of lung disease in newborn infants and older children, particularly disorders of pulmonary surfactant metabolism.

Choosing Wisely Workshop

An Overview of De-implementation Activities Across Canada and CTS’ Choosing Wisely Recommendations

Dr. Samir Gupta, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON

Unnecessary tests and treatments expose patients to harm, lead to more testing to investigate false positives and strain resources. Choosing Wisely is a campaign to help clinicians and patients engage in conversations about unnecessary tests and treatments. As part of this campaign, in 2017, the Canadian Thoracic Society published its “Top 6 Things Physicians and Patients Should Question” in Respiratory Medicine. Two of the six recommendations pertained to the importance of objective lung function testing before starting medications for airways disease (one recommendation for each of asthma and COPD). This hands-on session is a chance for members to get involved in the CTS Choosing Wisely initiative and will feature examples of de-implementation work from around the country, discuss how we might approach the implementation of objective lung function testing (gaps, consequences, barriers, enablers) and provide an opportunity for small group discussions on proposed possible de-implementation ideas.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • Recognize the various initiatives from within Canada that are targeting unnecessary tests and treatments in respiratory medicine;
  • Review the gaps, consequences, barriers, and enablers to performance of confirmatory pulmonary function testing before initiating therapy for asthma or COPD; and
  • Formulate pulmonary function testing implementation interventions based on knowledge of existing gaps and barriers.
Dr. Samir Gupta

Samir Gupta is a clinician-scientist at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael’s Hospital. He completed his Master’s degree in Clinical Epidemiology at the University of Toronto, followed by a fellowship in Knowledge Translation Research. His main research interest is in knowledge translation in primary care, across the spectrum of respiratory illness, with a focus on electronic tools, and asthma. He serves as Chair of the Canadian Respiratory Guidelines Committee and holds the University of Toronto Michael Locke Term Chair in Knowledge Translation and Rare Lung Disease Research.

1000 – 1030
1030 – 1130

Concurrent Sessions

Cochrane Review: Asthma & COPD

Cochrane Systematic Reviews in Context

Dr. Brian Rowe, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB

This Cochrane Collaboration has been described as a paradigm shift in clinical practice. The accumulation of evidence on treatments in health care in the form of systematic reviews provides the highest level of evidence in an unbiased and standard approach. Few other areas have benefitted as much from this evidence tsunami as respiratory health practitioners. The Airways Review Group has been a long-standing Cochrane entity and this session is designed to demonstrate some of the successes in Cochrane from the perspective of respiratory practitioners. Using the experience from three leading Canadian scientists, how the evidence from the Cochrane has shaped management now and what might be expected in the future will be explored.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • introduce participants to the Cochrane reviews, the Airway Review Group and the contributions made by systematic reviews to the field over the past 20 years;
  • examine the evidence in pediatric asthma, acute asthma and rehabilitation sciences that impact health practitioners; and
  • explore how contributions from the Cochrane reviews might impact respiratory health in the future.
Dr. Brian H. Rowe

Dr. Rowe is a Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Alberta and he practices emergency medicine at the University of Alberta Hospital, both in Edmonton, Alberta. He held a Tier I Canada Research Chair in Evidence Based Emergency Medicine from 2011-2018. He is Co-Editor of the Cochrane Airways Group and Editor of the textbook Evidence Based Emergency Medicine. Dr. Rowe is the Scientific Director of the Institute of Circulatory and Respiratory Health at CIHR.

What’s New in Childhood Asthma: Myths and Realities

Dr. Francine Ducharme, University of Montréal, Montréal, QC

Inhaled corticosteroids form the bedrock of asthma therapies, but worries about a potential effect on growth has lead to interest in intermittent use of ICS in children. Adding other medications to reduce symptoms and improve health-related outcomes have shown often different results from than observed in adults. The evidence supporting the safety and efficacy of various monotherapies and addon therapies to inhaled corticosteroids will be explored. The efficacy of novel therapeutic approaches such as anti-IgE and tiotropium for specific childhood phenotypes will be reviewed and evaluated in the context of systematic reviews of randomized trials.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • review the evidence supporting the safety and efficacy;
  • appraise the impact of adjunct therapy to ICS in children; and
  • examine the evidence supporting anti-IgE and novel therapeutic approaches in this age group.
Dr. Francine Ducharme

Dr. Ducharme is Professor in the Departments of Paediatrics and Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montréal. As paediatrician and clinical epidemiologist at the CHU Sainte-Justine, she leads a productive career as physician caring for asthmatic children, teacher, research mentor, and scientist. Her research program has led to >170 publications, 200 invited talks, numerous research awards, and co-authorship on several Canadian Asthma Consensus and International statements. She is pediatric editor of the Cochrane Airways Review group.

Acute Asthma Reviews and Guideline: Making an Impact

Dr. Cristina Villa-Roel, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB

Asthma exacerbations represent important periods of loss of asthma control. Reviews of acute asthma care have concluded that this condition is often under-treated and promising interventions designed to prevent future exacerbations fail to be implemented. This presentation will focus on the adjunct interventions that can assist in reducing hospitalizations and the risk of future relapses in acute asthma.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • understand the interventions that can assist in reducing hospitalizations and the risk of future relapses in acute asthma;
  • identify potential reasons for the limited implementation of interventions designed to prevent future asthma exacerbations; and
  • identify strategies to reduce the knowledge to action gap in this area.
Dr. Cristina Villa-Roel

Epidemiologist with experience in respiratory research.

Improving Care in COPD: Rehabilitation, Education and Drug Delivery

Dr. Dina Brooks, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON

The path from clinical trials to decision making at the bedside is long and systematic reviews play a crucial role in evaluating the evidence derived from multiple randomized controlled trials. Results of Cochrane reviews can be used by patients and clinicians almost immediately and even when the medical decision-making context is complex because benefits, harms, patient preferences and cost need to be factored in. When decisions are shrouded in complex circumstances, practice guidelines and decision aids may help to overcome the multidimensionality of the decision making context. This topic will be explored using the example of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • understand the role of systematic reviews in PR;
  • highlight key reviews in rehabilitation; and
  • identify the gaps.
Dr. Dina Brooks

Dr. Brooks is the Vice Dean (Health Sciences) and Executive Director of the School of Rehabilitation Sciences. Her research focuses on cardiopulmonary rehabilitation.

Interpretation of Sleep Studies: Interactive Workshop

The Lowdown on Downloads

Dr. Judith Leech, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON
Dr. Jacqueline Sandoz, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON
Dr. Doug McKim, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON

The presentation will focus on interpretation of downloads from positive pressure machines in various sleep disordered breathing scenarios such as obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, COPD and neuromuscular disorders.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • review the basics of downloads from positive pressure machines;
  • review specifics of downloads in OSA and COPD; and
  • review specifics of downloads in neuromuscular disorders.
Dr. Judith Leech

TBA

Dr. Jacqueline Sandoz

Dr. Sandoz practices pulmonary rehabilitation, sleep and general respirology in Ottawa. She has a special interest in chronic nocturnal ventilation in hypercapnia in COPD.

Dr. Doug McKim

Dr. McKim is a Professor of Medicine, University of Ottawa. He is medical director of the Ottawa Hospital Sleep Centre and CANVent Respiratory Rehabilitation Services. He has practiced sleep medicine since 2001. He has published 50 peer-reviewed papers and his clinical and research interests include long term ventilation and respiratory management of individuals with neuromuscular weakness.

Measurement Tools to Assess Lower Limb Muscle Function in the Clinical Setting: What Do They Really Tell Us?

Quadriceps Strength Assessment: Does It Measure What We Need?

Ms. Kim-Ly Bui, Institut universitaire de cardiologie et pneumologie de Québec, Québec, QC

Limb muscle dysfunction is a key systemic consequence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, associated among others to exercise intolerance, reduced quality of life, and premature mortality. The American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society therefore encourage the integration of quadriceps isometric strength assessment into the clinical assessment of people with COPD. Valid, reliable, easy to conduct and commercially available methods of strength testing will be described in this presentation, and should

be preferred to other common methods such as manual muscle testing or handheld dynamometers that rely on the evaluators’ skills and strength, and lack accuracy and precision. There has been recently increased interest in investigating the contribution of muscle dysfunction in limitations in activities of daily life. This presentation will thus also aim to highlight the potential limitations of static muscle function assessments when compared to dynamic assessments. These latter target other aspects of quadriceps function (such as endurance and power), which resemble more to functional activities’ requirements.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • discuss associations between diminished quadriceps muscle strength and clinical outcomes in COPD;
  • summarize the advantages and disadvantages of certain devices and protocols of quadriceps strength assessment in COPD; and
  • differentiate the various aspects of muscle function (strength, endurance, power) and their potential contribution to functional activities.
Ms. Kim-Ly Bui

Kim-Ly Bui completed her professional master in physical therapy at Laval University in 2016. She is about to obtain her MSc diploma at Laval University, under Didier Saey PT, PhD and François Maltais, MD co-direction, while working part time as a clinician. Her research work focused on lower limb muscle function assessments and functional tests in people with COPD. She has worked in projects and papers involving collaboration from Toronto, Vancouver, Halifax, Montreal and Umea in Sweden.

Walk This Way: Gait Speed and the Impact of Gait Aids

Dr. Kara Patterson, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON

Gait speed is a quick and easy tool to administer in the clinical setting. Gait speed is a reliable measure that is sensitive to change and can predict multiple outcomes across many patient populations including quality of life, hospitalization, discharge destination and rehabilitation potential. However, there are several factors to consider when administering a gait speed test and interpreting the results including task set up, preferred vs fast pace conditions, use of a rollator and what a measure of gait speed truly represents. This presentation will address all these considerations in an effort to provide attendees practical advice on how gait speed can be used to measure lower limb function and function in general in people with respiratory disease.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • perform a gait speed assessment with their patients;
  • interpret the results of a gait speed assessment; and
  • understand the what a measure of gait speed represents as well as its relationship to other factors like rollator use and test conditions.
Dr. Kara Patterson

Dr. Kara Patterson is a physiotherapist, an assistant professor in the Physical Therapy Department at the University of Toronto and a scientist at Toronto Rehab. She holds a clinician-scientist award from the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Her research focuses on improving gait and balance outcomes for people living with neurological conditions.

Best Practices in Balance Assessment for People with Chronic Lung Disease

Dr. Marla Beauchamp, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON

The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of best practices for assessing balance and fall risk in individuals with chronic lung disease. Evidence-based guidelines for older adults will be discussed, as well as a practical synthesis of evidence-to-date on common balance measures used in people with COPD including the Timed Up and Go, Single Leg Stance, Berg Balance Scale and Mini and Full Balance Evaluation Systems Tests. Finally, case scenarios will be provided to illustrate the process of evidence-based clinical decision-making with respect to balance assessment and treatment as part of the management of people with COPD.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • summarize evidence-based guidelines for assessing balance and fall risk in older adults;
  • describe the relevant measurement properties and evidence for common balance assessment tools in individuals with chronic lung disease; and
  • select and interpret balance measurement tools for use in people with COPD.
Dr. Marla Beauchamp

Marla Beauchamp is a physical therapist and Assistant Professor in the School of Rehabilitation Science at McMaster University and a Scientist at West Park Healthcare Centre in Toronto. Dr. Beauchamp’s research program focuses on assessment and treatment of late- life mobility problems. She has conducted numerous studies on balance and fall risk in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is recognized as an Emerging Research Leader in this area by the Canadian Respiratory Research Network.

Once in a Lifetime: Multi-specialty Session Examining Rare Pulmonary Malignancies in Pediatrics

The Clinical Perspective

Dr. Darryl Adamko, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON
Dr. Martha McKinney,Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC

Airway tumors do occur in children, but thankfully they are rare. Experiences will be shared in this area and an interesting presentation for the audience to consider will be provided.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • be aware of oncologic causes for complete lung collapse;
  • be aware of the pathologic differential of such a tumor; and
  • see the value of flexible bronchoscopy in these cases.
Dr. Darryl J. Adamko

Dr. Darryl J. Adamko is a Pediatric Pulmonary specialist with a strong bench research background after training at The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. He is Professor of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan where he is Division Head of Respirology and Pediatric Research. Dr. Adamko’s research focuses on mechanisms of virus-induced asthma attacks and the development of a novel urine‐based diagnostic test for asthma using mass spectrometry.

Dr. Martha McKinney

TBA

Presentation of Pathology Results

Dr. Dorothée Bouron-Dal Soglio, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON

Pathology images and results for three interesting and rare cases of malignancy involving the lungs in pediatric patients will be presented.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • understand the role of pathological examination in diagnosing rare pediatric lung tumors;
  • understand pathological features that can differentiate different rare pediatric lung tumors; and
  • understand some common techniques used in examining lung biopsy samples (colorations, anticorps, etc).
Dr. Dorothée Bouron-Dal Soglio


Dr. Dal Soglio is a pediatric and molecular pathologist (MD Phd), Head of the Service of Pathology at CHU Ste Justine, and Associate Professor in the Pathology department of University of Montréal.

Rare Lung Tumours in Pediatrics

Dr. Catherine Goudie, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON

This case-based presentation will discuss the clinical presentation, pathology features, management options as well as prognostic features for rare lung tumors presenting in childhood, including pleuropulmonary blastoma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma and others.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • understand the management options for rare pulmonary tumors in children;
  • describe the associations between certain cancer predisposition syndromes and pulmonary tumors in children and adolescents; and
  • describe the prognostic features of certain rare lung tumors in pediatrics.
Dr. Catherine Goudie

Dr. Goudie is a pediatric hematologist-oncologist at the Montreal Children’s Hospital. Following her core training, she completed a solid tumour and cancer genetics fellowship at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. She leads a research program on pediatric cancer predisposition syndromes.

1130 – 1230

Closing Plenary

Pharmacare: Medicare’s Unfinished Business or the Program That Will Sink It?

Mr. André Picard,The Globe and Mail

Universal coverage of prescription drugs – pharmacare – has been discussed for more than half a century in Canada. Now, it is finally on the political agenda. But what do we mean by pharmacare? Is it essential or unaffordable in today’s economic environment?

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • enhance their knowledge of Canada’s medicare system, and how pharmacare would fit;
  • discuss the expectations and hopes of the public, clinicians and policy-makers for pharmacare; and
  • examine how pharmacare could impact those with breathing disorders like COPD and asthma specifically.
Mr. André Picard

André Picard is the health columnist at The Globe and Mail and the author of five books, most recently “Matters of Life and Death.” He is a graduate of the University of Ottawa and Carleton University, and has received honorary doctorates from six universities, including UBC and the University of Toronto.

Poster Award Presentations & Closing Remarks

Poster Award Presentations & Closing Remarks by CRC 2019 Conference Co-Chairs Dr. Shawn Aaron and Dr. Judy King.